It’s just that the conditions are slightly tougher for them, says Ruturaj Gaikwad on India’s death bowling

 - Sakshi Post

Guwahati, Nov 29 (IANS) India batter Ruturaj Gaikwad came out in defence of the death bowling performance during their five-wicket loss to Australia in the third T20I, saying the conditions were tough for the bowlers due to dew, which increased the difficulty of gripping the wet ball.

In the defence of 223, barring Prasidh Krishna’s six-run 18th over, India’s death bowling was carted around for runs by Glenn Maxwell, who raced his way to a whirlwind 47-ball century, the fastest by an Australian batter in the shortest format.

"I don't think so death bowling is a concern. They are bowling with a wet ball and it’s tough on them. In these conditions, 12 runs an over, and even 13-14 runs an over are gettable. Even in the first game, we saw how easily we managed to chase 210. It’s just that the conditions are slightly tougher for them so we have to accept that and move on," said Gaikwad in the post-match press conference.

Maxwell’s 104 not out meant and him adding 91 runs off just 40 balls with stand-in skipper Australia completed a stunning come-from-behind win in dewy conditions, and Gaikwad credited the big-hitting batter for getting the tourists’ a win. "I think Maxi batted really well, and to win from a situation where they needed 100 from seven or seven-and-a-half overs, and then 50 from three overs, it was a creditable innings from him."

"Our bowlers tried executing what they had in their control, and the dew was making the ball slip, so it was tough for the bowlers as well. Even though we scored 230 in the last game, in between we felt the match might go till the last over. So with this kind of dew, these totals are bound to happen and bound to be chased.”

Maxwell’s efforts meant Gaikwad’s unbeaten 123 went in vain. His start to the knock wasn’t a rosy one, being on run-a-ball 22, before reaching his fifty in 32 balls and then accelerating his way to get his hundred in 52 balls.

"Initially I felt it was a little tacky, the ball was stopping a little bit, and there was some movement in the air and off the pitch as well. The first two-three overs, the wicket was like that, and we lost two wickets in a span of one over. It was important to stitch a partnership, but after 7-8 overs the wicket got slightly better."

"You cannot tend to lose three wickets in the powerplay. Knowing that Surya was there (and) he will play his shots, my plan and the communication was simple - that I will bat for a short span of time and (then) take the innings on," he concluded.

Disclaimer: This story has not been edited by the Sakshi Post team and is auto-generated from syndicated feed.

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